Gratitude

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,Thou art not so unkindAs man's ingratitude.

To Shakespeare, the writer of those lines, ingratitude apparently suggested something cold, hard, and unyielding, causing all that comes within its radius to wither, or become inert and stagnant. From this we may assume that we might well liken gratitude to a warm, soft breeze, which, passing over the earth, helps to awaken the trees from their winter sleep, causes the grass to grow, the flowers to push their way' through the soil, and everywhere a sense of activity and life to be manifested.

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"Hitherto hath the Lord helped us"
September 11, 1937
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