The Day of Atonement

Throughout the early history of the Jews the demand for atonement for sin was prominent. Aaron was the first high priest, and his son succeeded to that honor, and the Aaronic priesthood, as it was called, came to perform important religious rites and ceremonies.

Reading in the book of Leviticus of the elaborate preparations for extensive rituals on the day of atonement, one is impressed with the recognition of the need for holiness on the part of the early Jews. The appointing of stated times for purification from sin, the cleanliness demanded of the priests, and the sacrificial gifts indicate that the material ceremony typified, though faintly, a spiritual fact beyond their understanding at that time. And their efforts toward purification, when they were faithful in their worship of God, yielded proportionate results in the way of progress and better living.

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Profitable Business
October 14, 1933
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