Substance

Watching a group of airplanes, a student of Christian Science found herself analyzing these fleet birds of the air; and as she puzzled over what they might represent, it became evident to her that uplifted thought, soaring above the earth-bound forms of limited transportation, was the nucleus of the invention that to-day thrills the world and is so rapidly helping to eliminate time and distance. Our forefathers unquestionably would have scoffed at the possibility of these huge planes flying through space in safety. Oxcart, horse and wagon, train, and automobile—each came in its order in the line of progress, but each appeared to have some measure of safety in solid ground beneath its wheels, and men felt safe in them because terra firma held them up.

Following this reasoning, the student found herself endeavoring to understand more completely what substance really is. It is not terra firma; it is not what the world calls solidity. This becomes evident as one considers the progress of the ages, as expressed, for example, in the airplane and the radio. Then what is substance? Mind is substance. No other answer is possible. Mrs. Eddy writes in "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" (p. 508), "The only intelligence or substance of a thought, a seed, or a flower is God, the creator of it." God, Mind, expressed in ideas, is the substance, then, of the universe.

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Liberty
November 1, 1930
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