Signs of the Times

[From the Cambrige Tribune, Massachusetts]

An interview with Dr. Alfred Worcester, professor of hygiene at Harvard, printed in the Harvard Crimson, speaks a convincing word for prohibition. Dr. Worcester says: "No doctor who has gone out and worked among the poorer classes could ever vote for the modification of a law against intoxicating liquors. No member of the medical profession, unless he is a specialist who has not come in contact with the life of ordinary people, could be opposed to a law like the Volstead Act which prohibits the manufacture and sale of alcoholic drinks." In comparing conditions in his home town under local prohibition and otherwise, he continues: "A number of years ago my own town of Waltham used to vote 'yes' one year and 'no' the next on the dry question. The general degradation of the people was so much less in the dry years that no one could fail to observe it. And it seems only logical to suppose that if prohibition were a decidedly good influence in Waltham, it would also be throughout Massachusetts and the whole of the United States."

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ANNOUNCEMENTS
November 6, 1926
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