"The songs of Zion"

Every Bible student is more or less familiar with the account of the Israelites in bondage in Babylon. The writer of the one hundred and thirty-seventh psalm has drawn a very touching word picture of their plight in that "strange land": "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion. How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?"

How cheering and inspiring to know that even while in a "strange land," in bondage to foreign masters, surrounded by what must have seemed to be most depressing and discouraging conditions, at least some of these Israelites caught glorious glimpses of the ever-presence of God! The prophet Ezekiel, who was one of their number, says, "Now it came to pass ... as I was among the captives by the river of Chebar, that the heavens were opened, and I saw visions of God." Then follows a stirring account of those visions which, even after centuries have passed, thrill us and inspire us to be more Godlike, more persistent in our efforts for good, that we, too, may get soul-inspiring visions of God.

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Destroying the Graven Images
November 6, 1926
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