From the Press

[Rev. Joseph Fort Newton in Christian Commonwealth]

An aristocratic church, vain of its prestige, is not simply a travesty; it is a tragedy. Jesus, the Founder of the church, was of the democracy,—not a priest but a workingman, a layman whose pulpit was the hillside. When the church becomes Christlike, it will once more win the love and loyalty of the common people who, as Lincoln said, God must love, because He made so many of them. When the pulpit forgets its debate about rites and dogmas, of which Jesus knew nothing, and gives itself his friendly and brotherly spirit, its evangelism will send men to the fellowship and service of their fellows, as of old it taught them to flee the wrath to come. The hope of the church—and of the world—lies not in ritual word or legal policy, but in the spirit of him who said, "Whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant."

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July 13, 1918
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