"Speak, Lord, for thy Servant Heareth"

NOT he who prays most wins most, but he who is most truly reverent; whose attitude is most receptive, most sensitive to the touch that is divine; whose inner ear is wakeful to Truth's "still voice," and who ever craves for good with extended and expectant palm,—his gains are an hundredfold.

Sad and humiliating indeed is it to find oneself in the presence of an object of great interest, be it man or masterpiece, with no conscious responsiveness to its greatness: and how beggarly poor does one feel as he turns away, knowing that even that which he had,—the content of ignorance,—even that hath been taken away from him. Yet how much sadder to discover that through ignorance, stupidity, or vagrancy of thought we have been so irreverent, so irresponsive at the moment of supreme opportunity and supreme need, as to be robbed of the strength and inspiration of the Word that was spoken for us from the foundations of the world.

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Editorial
A Subtle Enemy
February 19, 1903
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