Work and Rest

Modern sociology's trend is toward salvation from toil. Socialism, labor unions, and governments are devoting themselves to the lessening of the hours of work, and are advocating more leisure, more rest, and more pleasure. So zealously is this cause agitated that unthinking followers might become imbued with the opinion that escape from work would happify existence, and that compensated idleness is the goal toward which mankind must strive. They would set aside the divine law, "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap." Community of property is also advocated by many social reformers as a proof of justice and brotherhood, and the divine impartiality is the argument put forth in support of their doctrine.

On page 13 of Science and Health Mrs. Eddy says: "Love is impartial and universal in its adaptation and bestowals. It is the open fount which cries, 'Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters.'" "Come ye to the waters." There is a condition required of us if we would have our thirst slaked. We must come! We must exert ourselves if we would be rewarded. The reward reaped from the labor of others is never rightfully ours. It cannot bring satisfaction, it cannot do more than temporary good. Sooner or later we shall learn that real joy is to be found in spiritual work only, and that the fruits of our own efforts alone bring us the rest and contentment which humanity craves.

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Science Absolute
June 2, 1917
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