"KNOW THYSELF."

The valuable precept, "Know thyself," comes to us from the writings of one of the Greek philosophers. It was placed over the porch or entrance to one of the temples of ancient Greece, a witness to the fact that they, like we, sought for an answer to the question, "What must I do to be saved?"

Webster's Dictionary gives the definition of the verb "to know" as follows: "To perceive with certainty; to understand clearly; to have a clear and certain perception of truth, fact, or any thing that actually exists; e.g., we know that truth and falsehood express ideas incompatible with each other." Juvenal writes (Satires, xi. 27), "The precept, 'Know thyself,' is heaven-born;" and when it is considered in conjunction with the teaching of Christian Science, it is indeed the open door which no man can shut, a veritable entrance to the holy of holies. "Know thyself:" know that the true selfhood is spiritual, not material; that it is eternal, not temporal; that it is coexistent with God, the Lord and giver of life; that it is a son of the living God, joint heir with Christ; that it is free from the law of sin and death, and in this knowing human consciousness will pass from death unto life.

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