A Holy Habitation

Because thou hast made the Lord, which is my refuge, even the most High, thy habitation; there shall no evil befall thee, neither shall any plague come nigh thy dwelling.—Psalms.

Every man's consciousness is for him an individual dwelling-place wherein he holds communion with everything of which he is cognizant. It is through the windows of his own thought that he looks out upon an external world, or looks in upon the impressions of his own mind and heart. Each man's thinking constitutes his own castle, furnished within by the quality of his thoughts, and open to outside invitation or attack only as the entrances are left unguarded. And the man whose trend of thought leads him upward, finds in the teaching of Christian Science that which aids him to build a mental habitation, cleansed and purified within, and fortified against all that should remain without. Ruskin has said, "To get peace, make yourselves nests of pleasant thoughts." Men have labored untiringly along all lines of development and education to provide for themselves that intellectual knowledge which enjoys all that is beautiful, true, and great; to secure dwelling-places of satisfaction for the affections; to insure habitations of ease for the senses. Yet in all this search for a secure mental stronghold, the standards may have been personal rather than impersonal, human instead of divine; and because of this there is no really holy habitation until the Master of the household, the Mind of Christ, enters and takes possession of His own.

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Why Science First Appealed to Me
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