Exemption from occupational hazards

Many jobs have two labels attached to them. One label lists the hazards of the occupation and the other the benefits. Often the items may seem to balance each other in such matters as long hours versus good prospects for promotion; dangers of physical injury versus good pay; mental pressures versus spiritual rewards. Candidates for the jobs may weigh the advantages and disadvantages before deciding whether or not to get involved. Then, having decided to go forward, they are liable to accept without question the possibility of suffering from the negative aspects of the occupation as well as enjoying the more positive rewards. But they need not do this.

Christian Science shows we need not—should not—accept the thought that penalties are attached to any right activity. If an occupation is lawful and beneficial to others, no one should expect that those engaged in it will suffer. The law of God, of the divine Principle from which the activity originates, can be trusted to keep safe those who are employed in it as well as to prosper the activity itself.

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October 30, 1978
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