The Brotherhood of Man

Today, in a world torn by misunderstanding, strife, war, and threats of war, efforts are repeatedly made to arrive at a basis of action from which peace and security for the human race may be lastingly attained. Try as it may, however, human ingenuity has so far failed to do more than temporarily alleviate the distress and hardships engendered by these evils. Lawmakers, educators, and statesmen stress the need for universal brotherhood; international pacts and treaties are made, alliances are entered into, only to be discarded or altogether broken. And thus there appears to run through human history a continually unfruitful and frustrated endeavor to bring peace on earth and good will to men. Especially has war impoverished and defrauded mankind until it would seem that common reason would cause men to cry out in rebellion against it, and utterly refuse any longer to give countenance to its claims.

A suggestion that seems most persistently to mesmerize the rulers of the nations is that war is necessary to attain peace; and so, wars to accomplish this end have time and again been declared and fought. To bring to pass the desired ends of peace in such a manner is an impossibility, for it must be plain that instruments of destruction and death cannot be the means of gaining peace and harmony. The brotherhood of man can flourish on no such impossible and contradictory basis. To wage war for peace is illogical. War in itself has no victory. Its glamour is an illusion. It contains no element of the good will which is the basis of peace.

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Article
Ushering
September 9, 1939
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