True Witnesses and False

IN recognition of the constant presentments of the so-called physical senses as to life and its conditions, the author of the book of Hebrews speaks of the great "cloud of witnesses" with which mortals are encompassed. He admonishes his readers to lay aside "every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us" and patiently to work out the salvation for which each is destined. And he holds up Christ Jesus as the great Exemplar, who showed the way to salvation which all may traverse.

The false witnesses which so completely encompass human experience are always and invariably the testimony of the physical senses. And since these senses are engendered in the belief that matter has both life and intelligence, they are false—utterly unreliable. Whatever is based in falsity is in itself false. And we know from proved experience that Life and intelligence are spiritual, wholly independent of matter. Then the testimony of these witnesses, these false witnesses, is to be denied, repudiated, on every occasion. Without this denial, we accept as true that which is untrue; and as a result, false witnesses are accorded a status to which they are in no wise entitled.

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Editorial
Spiritual Thinking
March 24, 1928
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