Unfoldment

THE student of Christian Science very early in his experience realizes the necessity of careful, prayerful preparation for his daily task. And if he is a faithful student, he never goes forth to the daily round of activities without first cleansing his thought of lurking beliefs in his own importance,—of any personal sense of responsibility,—knowing that man but reflects God's ability. With the sweet assurance of God's infinite ability, he silences the arguments of material sense,—fear, doubt, dread, and apprehension,—and joyously goes forth in the strength of God's might to do His will.

Perhaps to this beginner on the journey from sense to Soul there comes a period of bewilderment. He is astonished to find that even after he has to the best of his understanding claimed man's birthright, results are still far from satisfying; and he cries out like the rich young ruler of Jesus' time, "What lack I yet?" Then comes the further enlightenment, that his work will not be finished until he sees that the divine Mind never conceived an idea for which He did not have a reason and a place. There is always a John the Baptist crying in the wilderness, preparing the way for the spiritual idea. "Mine Angel shall go before thee" to prepare a place for thee. With the realization of the divine preparation of the receptive thought, another step in the process of unfoldment has been accomplished.

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"Thy will be done"
April 18, 1925
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