Communion

"Our Eucharist is spiritual communion with the one God;" so writes our beloved Leader on page 35 of "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures." And on page 154 of "The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany," she says: "Communing heart with heart, mind with mind, soul with soul, wherein and whereby we are looking heavenward, is not looking nor gravitating earthward, take it in whatever sense you may. Such communing uplifts man's being; it makes healing the sick and reforming the sinner a mutual aid society, which is effective here and now." Herein we find a twofold aspect of communion which presents marvelous possibilities of good. That one is dependent on the other is a foregone conclusion; for without a communion with God which brings an understanding of the oneness of divine Mind, how could any true unity among men be demonstrated?

In the days of the children of Israel, Moses alone was allowed to go up into the mount to talk with God, the priests and the people being forbidden to approach, lest they should be overwhelmed with His majesty. Later, it was, however, said of them, "They saw God, and did eat and drink." So, even in those olden days, men could gain a vision of Deity, which they could carry with them into the ordinary walks of life. The prophets talked with God. Then our Master, Christ Jesus, came; and he so constantly communed with the Father that he never failed to know exactly what was right to think and say and do under every circumstance. God always guided his every thought and word and deed, so that his entire earthly experience was one continuous victory over the false beliefs which would testify to something other than perfect unity with God, divine Mind.

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Editorial
Goodness
July 1, 1922
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