LOVE'S EXALTATION

In his thrice-repeated inquiry of Peter, "Lovest thou me?" the Master was addressing a disciple whose devotion had proved to be pitifully impulsive and unreliable. More than this, he was emphasizing for all time and all professed Christians the divine insistence that love shall be genuine; that Truth can tolerate no pretense; that, however simple the offering, it must be neither deformed nor marred. There is thus brought to awakening thought the need of thoughtfulness respecting the quality of one's affections.

We may feel hurt, as did Peter, by the intimations involved in Truth's persistent questioning, but this sensitiveness argues for rather than against the propriety of a careful examination on our part respecting the genuineness of our loving, since in no matters are we more subject to self-deception than in those of the heart. No plea is so likely to receive a favorable hearing at the bar of our judgment as that entered in behalf of some loved object, and we cannot be true to our need or to the scientific spirit if we hesitate to submit the heart of our devotions to the test of Truth.

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AMONG THE CHURCHES
January 6, 1912
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