The Bible as Judicial Authority

The Mechanical Adjuster

Some of the reasons why our judges so often quote Scripture are not far to seek. The magnificent Arch of Titus, reared to commemorate Judah's downfall, the desecration of her altars, the dispersion of her people, the total extinction of her laws, and the final and grandest triumph of imperial Rome, is but a crumbling ruin—a favorite haunt of the owl and the bat. For almost twenty centuries the children of Judah have been wanderers on the face of the earth, exiles from their own land, strangers and pilgrims, without a government, a city, a temple, or a home. While all other peoples have multiplied (the Anglo-Saxons having increased about sevenfold during the present century), Judah has remained stationary. At the date of the crucifixion the Jews numbered about seven millions, which is about their present numerical strength. But the Mosaic law, which the admirers of Titus so ostentatiously consigned to endless oblivion, remains a living, growing force. Translated into hundreds of languages, printed in thousands of editions, scattered broadcast by hundreds of millions of copies, that law has penetrated to the remotest corners of the earth. In this closing year of the nineteenth century there is no spot on the habitable globe where either female virtue, personal liberty, private property, or human life are safe, unless that spot has been visited by the Bible and subjected to its teachings. In the Anglo-Saxon jurisprudence of to-day there is very little to be found which cannot be traced to its source in the Mosaic code; and the little thus found is scarcely worth either fighting or praying for. To readers who do their own thinking, who delve beneath the surface, who follow the truth where it may lead, we commend the subjoined quotation.

It is borrowed from a charge given almost sixty years ago to a jury in one of the Atlantic States; and it doubtless voices the prevailing sentiment of the Anglo-Saxon bench and bar. Replying to some criticisms of the Mosaic code, made by counsel in the course of argument, the judge said this:—

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Teach the Children
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