Defusing hate. Living love.

A mere four chapters into the Bible, we find the first account of hatred and its effects in the story of brothers Cain and Abel, whose relationship devolved into jealousy and murder. Thousands of years after Cain and Abel, injustice, tyranny, jealousy, and anger still lead people all over the world to despise, misjudge, hurt, and even kill each other. In response, we offer our sympathies, perplexed by the inhumanity of hatred and its consequences. But regardless of when and how division and hatred began, the greater question is whether genuine reformation, forgiveness, love, and unity are possible in the face of these plagues. 

While it is natural to sympathize with those who’ve suffered from the consequences of hatred, human sympathy alone is not strong enough to compel real change or progress. So we call for justice, but even human justice does not completely heal. It may correct a particular situation and punish the person who has harmed or killed another, but it does not fully get at the roots and hurt of bigotry and anger, or cure victimization. 

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