Evil, not what it may appear to be

There are lots of things to think about as we attend to our daily responsibilities. Families need care; our homes, no matter how simple they may be, need attention; there are bills to pay and errands to run; and, of course, there are the jobs we hold that earn the wages that are needed.

We might be tempted to think that only "professional" thinkers—religious people, philosophers, and others who might be listed of similar calling—spend time seeking to understand what gives order to the world, how man is related to God, or what is the meaning and nature of evil. Yet each one of us has an interest—a crucial interest—in what brings order and purpose into the world, in how we can deal with evil and hurt, and in how God is related to us. It's in our own interest to realize that all of us are "thinkers" about the big issues that shape our lives.

May 13, 1991
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