Soldiers and Devoutness

We are at this time being constantly reminded of our obligations to those on land and sea who are rendering such heroic service in defense of civilization, which in its truer sense means Christianity. It goes without saying that we would none of us shirk in any wise the payment of this debt; hence we need to know how we can best meet it, and as Mrs. Eddy says (Science and Health, p. 1 ), "No loss can occur from trusting God with our desires, that they may be moulded and exalted before they take form in words and in deeds."

Students of Christian Science can never think of the men who are serving the country, whether in camp or on the battlefield, as other than the highest type of men, whose deepest needs and desires are moral and spiritual, in brief, as our brother. If any who accept the gospel teachings question this statement they may recall Matthew's account of the centurion who came to Jesus and asked him to heal his servant who was desperately ill. We are told that when Jesus offered to go with him, the centurion spoke of his own unworthiness to have the Master enter his home, but he did not stop at this, for he added, "Speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed." We read that Jesus marveled and said to those about him, "I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel." Nor is this all, for we are told that at Jesus' crucifixion, the centurion who stood by the cross said, "Truly this was the Son of God,"—a remarkable confession when we remember that it took Simon Peter long association with Jesus to reach this conviction and to voice his recognition of the truth it declares.

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Editorial
Perfect Peace
January 26, 1918
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