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The one important reason for a genuine unity of Christians is expressed by Christ himself when he prayed for his disciples, "that they may be perfected into one; that the world may know that thou didst send me, and lovedst them, even as thou lovedst me." (John, 17:23, Am. Rev.)

From these words two conclusions inevitably follow and should be recognized as the imperative reasons for seeking that union of all Christians for which Jesus prayed. The first conclusion is, that Jesus did not expect that the world would be convinced of his divine character unless his followers should be united; and the second conclusion is that he did not expect that the world would believe in God's love for men unless they could see that his disciples loved each other. In other words, the true and substantial unity of Christians is the basis on which alone can be founded any expectation of the general reception by the people of this world of Jesus as divine and of the Father as a God of love. In the presence of this stupendous argument for Christian union all other considerations, however true they may be, sink into relative insignificance.

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April 1, 1905
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