Dwelling Places

Most of us bestow much thought upon our dwelling places, our homes, as we call them. We adorn them with things of beauty and comfort; we spend time and money in molding them according to our individual tastes and desires. Many people, however, do not realize that a dwelling place is primarily mental: it represents the thoughts we entertain. That is why we may have the experience of entering some homes where, outwardly, there is abundance of warmth, luxury, and art, yet of being conscious of emptiness, coldness, and dissatisfaction. The mental atmosphere speaks more loudly than the physical environment.

The word "environment" is an interesting one. It means that with which we are surrounded. A dictionary defines "environ" as "to encompass, to completely enclose," and as being synonymous with the word "embrace." It is well to gain the right meaning of environment, and to consider where our thoughts habitually dwell. Are we dwelling constantly, for example, with what Mrs. Eddy calls "the first and fundamental rule" of Christian Science, which is "that God is good; hence, good is omnipotent and omnipresent" (Miscellaneous Writings, p. 172); in the understanding of "the final fact" (ibid., p. 63), which is "that God is omnipotent and omnipresent; yea, 'that the Lord He is God; there is none else beside Him'"?

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Church Building and Healing
March 23, 1935
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