FAITH AND UNDERSTANDING

In writing to the Romans, St. Paul says: "Israel, which followed after the law of righteousness, hath not attained to the law of righteousness. Wherefore? Because they sought it not by faith, but as it were by the works of the law." The objection of many who come as a last resort into Christian Science for the healing it promises, and who, as is readily understood, have not yet awakened to its spiritual import, is that it offers them nothing tangible upon which to rest. "I believe in prayer," they earnestly affirm, "and I have perfect faith that with God all things are possible; but I want to see that something is being done."

Here surely is the faith that demands a sign. If such a thing were that one had never beheld the trees before the winter frosts had dried and denuded them—if one had never known them to be in any other condition than this, with what degree of faith would he look for the marvel of spring's unfolding? Who that has gloried in this regeneration of nature can say that he ever saw anything tangible happening? Of a sudden the wonder is wrought, and thus too we know that God is Life because His work bears witness to it. "All that God imparts," Mrs. Eddy tells us, "moves in accord with Him, reflecting goodness and power" (Science and Health, p. 515). If in the flowers of the field we may find the pledge and fulfilment of divine goodness and power, as Christ Jesus taught, how incomparably greater should be our faith that the supreme manifestations of His divine purpose stand certain of the perfect regeneration which Spirit unfailingly confers. The trees of the forest, the flowers of the field, unquestioning, raise their heads in perfect accord with infinite law, and speak as Jesus taught, for the presence of infinite Mind, its beauty and truth.

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"THE UPWARD JOURNEY"
March 2, 1912
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