FROM OUR EXCHANGES

[The Outlook.]

No one who does not know other literatures, and especially other Oriental literatures, can appreciate the extraordinary difference of note between the Bible and other writings; its quiet, apparently unconscious assumption of authority, its definite and unhesitating attitude of command, its direct statement without any attempt to buttress its position by abstract reasoning, its simple narrative of unprecedented experiences and unusual events as if they were matters of common knowledge, its freedom from abstract statement, its marvelous concreteness. It habitually wears the air and uses the speech of revelation; it never explains, justifies, reasons; it is throughout a literature of intuition, insight, and vision anchored solidly in human experience and vitally bound up with historical events. It is, above all other books, the Book of Life, not only because it deals with the ultimate things of the soul, but because it is the book of the life of a race; bone of its bone and blood of its blood in its substance, but soaring far above the reach of its highest experiences in its revelation of God to man and of man to himself.

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June 15, 1907
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