ON PRACTICING INTEGRITY

If we think of integrity as a strong, silent kind of quality, Stephen L. Carter invites us to think again. Strong it is, but only if regularly and vigorously exercised. Integrity, then, is like religious freedom: use it or lose it. And if it's lost on a personal level, the fundamental architecture of community is weakened. As more citizens choose to live "an integral life," however, society is progressively strengthened.

A law professor at Yale University, Carter explains in his book Integrity (New York: Basic Books, 1996) that practicing integrity has three essential steps: "... (1) discerning what is right and what is wrong; (2) acting on what you have discerned, even at personal cost; and (3) saying openly that you are acting on your understanding of right from wrong" (p. 7).

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God got there first
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