Alone with God

Loneliness seems to be a big problem to many a one. Separated perhaps from those who once were, and still may be, their friends, away from their kindly influence, many believe themselves forsaken and disconsolate. They are alone, they think; and in their solitariness they feel like isolated, neglected specks in a great, unfriendly universe. Loneliness seems at times very real, just as any other form of human affliction may seem real. But loneliness is a false belief; and whosoever would be rid of it must look upon it as such.

It can be truthfully said that if one is fully engaged with some useful occupation, he will not be lonely: he will not experience that sense of isolation which so often ultimates in depression. When one is busy he has no time to brood, no time to allow his thoughts to turn in upon himself in melancholy imaginings; and the result is that loneliness does not trouble him. But should he cease to be occupied and allow thought to become self-centered, then loneliness is apt to settle down upon him, darkening his outlook, quenching his happiness, making his life miserable.

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Editorial
One Universal Journey
October 10, 1925
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