"Through the midst of the sea"

There is, perhaps, no narrative in the Old Testament that appeals more to the imagination of the child than does the account of Moses and the children of Israel being brought safely "through the midst of the sea" on dry land. No earthly means of escape seemed at hand,—the sea was in front of them, the armies of Pharaoh behind. This tale of deliverance never loses interest; and as we grow in years its meaning deepens as our need demands.

After one's first wonderful experience of healing in Christian Science he feels that, truly, he too has been brought safely "through the midst of the sea" on dry land,—that Christian Science has built a strong wall of defense between him and the storm and stress of human experience. Christian Science indeed does this very thing, but not always in the way one might suppose; for instead of bringing one into a haven of rest and giving him a sense of bodily comfort and ease which will never be disturbed, he soon finds that Christian Science brings no such state of apathetic inactivity, but rather a call to higher efforts, such as the overcoming of faults of character as well as of the ills of the flesh. It, however, provides the shield and buckler and the strong arm, as well as the dry land upon which one may pass unharmed through the turbulent sea of supposititious mortal laws, opinions, limitations, and fears.

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"Our Father"
November 1, 1924
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