True Freedom

As generally understood, freedom means the possession of the unobstructed privilege and power to do as one pleases. It is thought of as exemption from restraint, the ability to gratify the dictum of desire. But wherever and whenever the light "which lighteth every man" has dawned in the world, it has meant an advance in the human thought of freedom; it has made men see that the happiness they have identified with it is not to be found in the gratification of appetite and impulse, but in the escape from their rule. Christ Jesus pressed this upon the thought of mankind as it had never been before. His great theme was that men must become responsive to a higher law, be supreme where they once were subject.

Devotion to this spiritual ideal was splendidly manifest in the early Christians; nevertheless, it is just here that the church has come short in all the later centuries. It has been said that Schiller "distrusted religious organizations of all kinds, fearing their tendency to fetter the human spirit," and that he "found the life of the Spirit to consist in the liberty to discover and assimilate the will of God," that is, divine law. In this the poet surely glimpsed the emancipating light of truth which is so apparent in Christian Science.

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Editorial
Family Ties
March 21, 1914
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