Progression

When Some seven years ago the Sentinel enlarged its borders, four pages of reading matter being added and a new cover design adopted, it seemed as if the acme of excellence in service to the field had been reached, but it will be noticed that with this first issue of its sixteenth year our weekly paper has taken on a typographical appearance somewhat changed for the better we believe, and one which it is hoped will be even more satisfactory to its steadily enlarging circle of readers, as we have adopted the same face of type for this paper as that used in the Journal, beginning with the April, 1912, number. This style of type has been selected for both Sentinel and Journal, not only because it is considered one of the most beautiful employed in the printing art, but also because it is the most distinct and readable of any of those adapted to modern magazine printing. A further advantage is that its more compact face makes possible an appreciable percentage of increase in the amount of reading matter printed in each issue of the Sentinel, an addition which we think the readers of this paper will be quick to approve as a step in the right direction, as is also the simplified style selected for the department headings and captions.

As to the cover design, practically no change has been made, although a certain amount of refinement and architectural correctness in execution will doubtless be noted with approval. Beyond this there can be neither desire nor occasion for change in the Sentinel, from the fact that at the time this weekly publication was instituted our revered and beloved Leader, Mrs. Eddy, named it "Christian Science Sentinel," and selected for its motto these words of Jesus: "What I say unto you, I say unto all—Watch." Mrs. Eddy likewise gave instructions, at the time the new cover of the Sentinel was under consideration in 1906, that it should be light blue in color, that the design should include the figures of two women, each holding a lamp, and that the inscription on the pedestals should be Longfellow's significant lines,—

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Editorial
Prejudice
September 6, 1913
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