THE BASIS OF CONTENT

Indifferent toleration of the imperfect conditions of human life, or joyless resignation to the belief that such conditions are inevitable, may be called content; but the term is properly applied only to the glad satisfaction that one feels when he has learned the real purpose of life and labor, and is working toward the fulfilment of this purpose. To know genuine content, then, it is necessary first to define correctly the purpose that gives meaning to life.

There is a plane of human existence upon which the petty cares and pleasures of each day appear to be all-engrossing. Those who live on this plane scarcely rise above an unquestioning and unreflecting satisfaction with sordid aims and achievements. Many others, more awake to the possibilities of man's intelligently-directed activities, conceive the end of existence to be wealth, fame, or power; but the futility of striving to find permanent satisfaction and content in worldly riches or honor proves to such seekers that what they believed to be a purpose worthy of their most earnest efforts is neither true nor desirable.

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THE MATERIAL SENSES
April 25, 1908
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