Clearer Views Needed

A STATEMENT of deep import to every student of Christian Science is that in which Mrs. Eddy tells of her own experience in first seeking to express the "Science of Mind" as then revealed to her. She says that "as former beliefs were gradually expelled from her thought, the teaching became clearer, until finally the shadow of old errors was no longer cast upon divine Science" (Science and Health, p. 460). If this process of change and renewal of thought and its expression was so necessary in the case of our dear Leader, who was fitted above all others to receive the truth of being and to impart an understanding of it to others, what must be the need of those who seek the truth mainly because they are impelled to do so by suffering. With few exceptions, people come to Christian Science asking only for physical help, and in many instances they are unwilling to surrender their "old errors,"—their beliefs in the reality of sin, disease, matter and its supposed laws,—to say nothing of their adherence to age-worn theories respecting personal God and the fall of man.

In most cases a large measure of spiritual illumination comes with the physical healing, and the teachings of our text-book are then accepted as the truth. There is, however a mighty transformation to be effected in every one before the perfect understanding of God and man as His spiritual likeness is attained and demonstrated. If imperfection still exists to the sense of an individual, it proves that all errors of belief have not yet been eliminated from his mentality. Science shows that there is no evil in God, and none His likeness,—the real man,—and that the acceptance of this truth is followed by wonderful results in the healing and uplifting of the human sense. Such being the case, it is surely of the utmost importance that all errors of belief be "expelled" from consciousness, in order that the truth, the Science of man's being, may be fully recognized and obeyed. We are seldom aware of the tenacity of mortal habits of thinking. until we suffer from them in some way, and gradually, perhaps slowly, overcome them,—until these habits shall have given place to the continuous reflection of Truth's ideas.

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Editorial
The Building Fund
May 12, 1906
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