POWER, POLITICS, AND PRAYER

Romania through a Romanian's eyes

Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Nineteenth-century British historian Lord Acton's truism on power presaged with chilling accuracy what would happen in the following century to countries that fell under communist control. And Romania under Nicolae Ceausescu would be a worst-case example of Acton's insight.

Nicole Draghici (pronounced DrahGEECH) lives in Bucharest, Romania's capital city. She visited the Sentinel offices recently to talk with me about changes in her homeland. She has seen both extremes of corruptive power—the total personal power and corruption of the Ceausescu regime, and the near power vacuum and resulting social disarray in post-revolution Romania, after the communist government was overthrown and the Ceausescus were executed in 1989.

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