'First lessons of the children'

POPULAR CULTURE often views the Ten Commandments as strict taskmasters from and for a time gone by. The idea of being told what one can or cannot do with his or her personal life feels outdated and stifling. Yet I've come to love these laws as keys to the freedom of relying on the inexhaustible presence of Love itself. While following the Commandments requires humility and discipline, I'm convinced that the resulting rewards and self-government are unlimited.

The secret is to begin at the beginning, with God. According to the book of Exodus, God spoke to Moses, saying, "I am the Lord thy God, .... Thou shalt have no other gods before me" (20:2,3). Later, the Psalmist rejoiced in referring to God as "full of compassion, and gracious, longsuffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth" (86:15). Jesus called God Abba, or "Father," and gave Him credit for the healings he performed. As a result of studying the Bible and Jesus' healing works, Mary Baker Eddy discerned that "God is what the Scriptures declare Him to be,—Life, Truth, Love" (Science and Health, p. 330).

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Timeless life-guides
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