ITEMS OF INTEREST

PHIL DAVIS KNEW he was in trouble the instant the all terrain vehicle he was riding uphill shot out from under him, tossing him in the air. He landed on his back with a hard crunch, the ATV crashing down between his legs. Davis, a member of The First Church of Christ, Scientist, which shuns traditional medical care, feared he had suffered a serious injury. "The first thought was that I'd really hurt myself and the second thought was that I'd done something really stupid and my third thought was that God was not thinking about me in that way," he said.

As Massachusetts works to turn its landmark health care reform law into a reality, regulators are picking their way through a minefield of vexing issues, not all of them related to the cost of co-pays and office visits. In the case of Christian Scientists and others who opt for alternative care either out of personal preference or religious belief, the state has to decide if health care always equals medical care. Christian Scientists want to be sure the state recognizes spiritual healing as credible health coverage.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
ACTUALLY, LIFE IS NOT A LOTTERY
October 9, 2006
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit