"Be ye separate"

THE early Christians, in the time of Paul, constituted but a very small minority of the populace, and everything they did was closely observed by their enemies. Any dereliction of a follower of Christ Jesus was seized upon to discredit his teachings. Paul recognized that it was necessary for the followers of the Master to avoid as much as possible close association with those whose conduct was such as might bring criticism upon the little band of Christians. He wrote to the Corinthians, "Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing." It was not, of course, primarily from persons that he saw the Christians must separate themselves, but from whatever thought and action on their own part was unprofitable.

Paul's admonition is as applicable today as it was in the time of the early Christians. While Christian Scientists mingle politically, in a business way, and socially with those of other faiths, or of no faith at all, it is necessary for them to stand firmly by their highest understanding of Principle under all circumstances. But they find, frequently, that as they practice faithfully the teachings of their religion, they no longer care for certain kinds of entertainment which once may have seemed entirely harmless and even desirable. They are led quite naturally to seek the companionship of those who cherish spiritual ideas and endeavor to manifest true spirituality—those who will bless them, and whom they can bless, through the association.

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Co-operation in Church Building
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