Progress and Experience

WITHOUT experience there can be no progress. The student of Christian Science welcomes experiences; he knows that they are milestones on his road from sense to Soul. It soon becomes apparent, however, to the one earnestly striving for an increasing understanding of God, good, that there are experiences which should be avoided. Why? Because they do not contribute to one's well-being or advancement.

Whatever tends to perpetuate the belief in matter should be regarded as an enemy, because it beclouds the spiritual sense of good and brings one farther into mental darkness. Fleshly appetites, such as the craving for intoxicants, the unnatural habit of smoking, or the indulgence of sensuous pleasures, all must give way to that which satisfies one's spiritual aspirations. Mary Baker Eddy writes on page 296 of the Christian Science textbook, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures": "Progress is born of experience. It is the ripening of mortal man, through which the mortal is dropped for the immortal. Either here or hereafter, suffering or Science must destroy all illusions regarding life and mind, and material sense and self. The old man with his deeds must be put off."

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
The Remedy Is Spiritual
November 11, 1939
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit