The Demoniac

THE story of the man who dwelt among the tombs in the land of the Gadarenes, whom no man could tame, reveals the misery, unrest, and ofttimes wildness of the thought which dwells in a belief of life as material, tossed and torn by sin and its effects,—remorse, anguish, and all the train of evils which circle around the dominant thought of a physical self. It is limited by circumstances and bound by a sense of fatality which resolves itself into fear and dread of the unknown, and, to its sense, unknowable. The possibility of present release from this condition seems almost inconceivable to the human mind, which has submitted to these conditions with a resignation that would be heroic were it not so pitiable and so unnecessary to our enlightened understanding of the true mission of Jesus.

Jesus came to burst these bonds of thought, or thoughts of bondage, asunder, the last he rent being that of the tomb, or thought of death. He said he came that we "might have life" and "have it more abundantly." and our Leader has given to the world the Science by which we may obtain this life.

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Poem
Allegiance
August 5, 1905
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