Christianity an Affair of the Life

Boston Herald

Senator Hoar, in his address at the opening of the Unitarian Conference in Saratoga, called attention to the remarkable unanimity of the recognition of President MeKinley's character and habit as representative of the true Christian life. "Men of all Christian sects," he said, "are taking this occasion to declare what it is that makes the true Christian, what sort of example men ought to imitate, and what entitles them to the favor of God. We hear nothing of Athanasian creeds, or the five points of Calvinism, Unitarian statements of faith, or church covenants, or decrees of councils; but Catholic and Protestant, and Calvinist and Presbyterian, and Universalist and Unitarian, and Methodist and Episcopalian, speaking by their most trusted representatives and their highest authorities, declare that this man's life was Christian, and that this man's faith was Christianity." That is a just statement of what the nation has lately witnessed. There never has been a more universal acknowledgment that a pure and upright life is the essential proof of acceptable Christian faith, independent of creed or confession, than the comment on President McKinley since his death. We have observed no lament anywhere that he did not belong to another sect than the one to which he did belong, no intimation that he was a heretic regarding whose future, if Christianity be true, there can be a doubt.—Boston Herald.

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Dr. Mitchell's Sage Advice
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