A great reward

Times have changed. Caregiving was for so long considered a natural part of a family's fabric. Today, though, a common perception of giving care—to a parent or relative—is that it can be a burden, both in time and cost. Of course, that doesn't mean there isn't a genuine desire to serve, love, and pray for those in need.

This concept isn't new, as seen in the universally loved story of Ruth in the Bible, which took place around the 11th century bce. Ruth, a Moabite, was young when her Hebrew husband died. But rather than return to her birth family, Ruth chose to be with Naomi, her mother-in-law, whose husband and sons had also died. Ruth declared, "Thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God" (Ruth 1:16). Naomi yearned to return home to Bethlehem, and so they walked there together. When reading this story, it's easy to conclude that Naomi wasn't very companionable. On the other hand, the book has led readers to feel that because of her choice, Ruth's life was all grace, her care of Naomi effortless, and her reward great.

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ITEMS OF INTEREST
June 16, 2008
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