The decision years

In our late teens to mid-twenties we're perhaps especially faced with decisions—decisions that set certain courses for our lives: education, marriage, career, attitude toward morality and toward religion (whether we've been brought up in a religion or not). If things are to go well, this will not be a matter of luck but of good choices.

Any time is a good time to become a skilled decision maker. There's a rule of thumb that, when we understand it, makes us better choosers. This is the way Mary Baker Eddy puts it: "The point for each one to decide is, whether it is mortal mind or immortal Mind that is causative." Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, p. 195; The way we arrive at a decision can be as important as the decision itself—in fact, our general views about life determine what kind of choice we make, in so many things. When we take a metaphysical rather than a physical view of ourselves and the world, this makes a world of difference. It eliminates the luck element.

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Editorial
The dotted line
May 29, 1978
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