Coming and Going

Of all that seems to concern the human mind perhaps nothing engages its attention quite so much as the many and varied phases of coming and going. All who have been in the crowded streets of a city or on the less frequented highways of rural districts have been impressed, deeply or otherwise, by this concept of so-called worldly activity. The constant striving to get somewhere, to reach some desired place, to attain some point of supposed advantage, has engaged the attention of mankind since the evolution of eternity has been regarded as the passing of time. The rise and fall of nations, the appearing and disappearing of industrial concerns, the arrival and departure of means of transportation, the planting and harvesting of crops, the buying and selling of merchandise, and the coming and going of persons all testify to the large extent this sense of finite movement occupies mortal thought. Likewise growth and decay, expansion and contraction, advancing and receding, bringing and sending are all phases of this sense of coming and going. Indeed, to mortal sense, all things seem to be on a more or less "here to-day and gone to-morrow" basis.

What, then, is the meaning of all this seemingly endless worldly activity, all these myriad manifestations of coming and going, whether outwardly evident as legitimate business or seemingly obscured by darkness or material walls? Simply this: that this sense of coming and going, including itself, as it does, in the whole of mortal thought, is the counterfeit of the stable unfoldment of divine Principle. In other words, finite coming and going is the human mind's sense of activity, and all the while divine Mind's idea of activity is actually being manifested in an infinitude of good. Right where and when the personal senses would say that some individual is engaged in industrial activity the spiritual senses combine in their evidence to substantiate the truth the real man is lovingly about the "Father's business."

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Right Endeavor
November 26, 1921
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