Leaving All for Truth

The account of the healing of blind Bartimaeus (Mark, 10: 46—52) shows us plainly what disposition it is that receives the reward in Christian Science. The blind man did not heed the rebuke of some bystanders that he should hold his peace, but "cried out the more a great deal," and then when Jesus commanded him to be called, he, "casting away his garments, rose and came to Jesus." And just so, when in spite of the many times well—meant advice of some of our friends that we submit to what appears to them inevitable, we persist in appealing to Truth to "have mercy on us," to give us our sight, because we feel it to be our inalienable right to be whole, and then hear Christ encouraging us to come to him, we shall do well to do as did the blind man, cheerfully cast aside our out—grown and out—worn garments of hygiene, scholastic theology, speculative philosophy, and all the et cetera of human means of covering the nakedness of mortal existence; and we need never fear that in casting aside the errors that we have perchance hugged so closely about us, we shall be in any danger of losing aught of Truth that we may already possess, for as our revered Leader, Mary Baker G. Eddy, says in "Unity of Good" (p. 10), "All that is beautiful and good in your individual consciousness is permanent."

But many who sincerely desire the Truth often overlook this point. They fear, because Christian Science demands that they leave all unreservedly for Truth, that it is their duty to give up what they know to be right and true. Now there could not be a greater misapprehension of the teaching of Christian Science on this point, as will be seen by studying "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" and the other works of its author, Mary Baker G. Eddy, the Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science. How illogical it is to suppose that Truth can ever ask us to give up what we already know to be true! Christian Science burns up the dross, but only refines the gold.

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Christian Science is Practical
August 9, 1900
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