From Our Exchanges

Certainly more than one half of all the so-called religious discussion going on in books, magazines, newspapers, synods, conferences, parliaments, and even in churches themselves, do not even suggest the essentials of religion. They tend to barrenness, because religion is a movement of the spirit and manifests itself in sentiments and emotions which lead to thought and action. It will be a great gain to all churches and to all-religious people when we see, and agree to say, that creeds and philosophies, scientific studies and rituals, modes of church government, and comparisons of them, are not in themselves religion, and that, if we depend upon them, we shall forget the vital realities which they tend to obscure.

What was the secret of the grip Phillips Brooks and Henry Drummond had on men? Why, it is found in their very abandon of unselfishness, self-forgetfulness, and self-expenditure. ... The distinctive power of the pulpit is in its personality; not primarily what it says, important as that is, but who says it; not the clothing which a man wears, but what is the spirit of the man who is inside the clothes: not whether a man receives three hundred and forty dollars for every sermon he preaches, but whether the man and his message so correspond that the voice of God is heard sounding in the soul.—Methodist Review.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
Notices
January 14, 1905
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit