Protecting Our Crops

Some of us will plant a garden this year. A few rows of beans and peas. Perhaps some carrots and corn. Even a modest potato patch. Others will raise a tomato plant in an apartment window box, while still others will seed vast fields of grains and other crops. But all of us, whether we sow a seed or not, have an important stake in the yield of this year's crops. Their success will have wide implications, from consumers in industrialized nations to children in isolated parts of underdeveloped countries.

The yield is supposed to depend, in large measure, on weather conditions, the control of bugs and diseases, and adequate care of the soil. But in truth, it is our concept of these factors that largely determines success or failure. A developing understanding of God and His true creation can progressively free mankind from the adverse effects that various conditions appear to have on crops.

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Editorial
Healing Antagonism by Turning the Other Cheek
May 7, 1977
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