True Liberty

Liberty, in its generally accepted sense, means freedom from bondage or as a dictionary defines it, "the state or fact of being free ... opposed to bondage." Through the study of the Scriptures, where the use of the word liberty is frequent, and through the thoughtful consideration of its spiritual significance as used by Mrs. Eddy in "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" liberty comes to have an entirely new meaning, one which brings to the earnest student of Christian Science a realization of the dominion that is the inevitable result of apprehending the true idea of liberty. Embracing as it does only that which is real, that which is of God, good, and rejecting that which is unreal, the counterfeit of good, true liberty must be infinite—that which is, now and forever. It must be always present, because being infinite it could never be absent. It must be complete, because nothing can be taken from or added to that which is infinite; and because infinity is never for a moment without its complete and perfect expression, man, it follows that man must reflect, express, and know all there is to know about true liberty. The ever presence of liberty having been established, the consciousness of its ever presence must be apparent to man now.

When Christ Jesus sent the seventy disciples about the Father's business he gave them this instruction: "Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you." Every one of the seventy had to make that instruction his own by proving the truth of it for himself before he could demonstrate that truth in the breaking of bonds for another. Doubtless patience, perseverance, and courage were requisite in the proving, but when the seventy returned from the scenes of their labors they came rejoicing in their knowledge that the Christidea, the demonstrable truth which they practiced, gave them dominion over every false belief that attempted to call itself a reality. By refusing to entertain it as consciousness they had proved the "power of the enemy" powerless—no power. Small wonder they rejoiced in the eternal truth they had established as a law of liberty for those unto whom they ministered.

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Demand and Supply
October 23, 1920
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