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Dialogue With The World

Do Christian Scientists care about humanity?

From the Office of Committee on Publication The question in the title has been asked by many over the years, sometimes quite skeptically. The skepticism stems at least partly from society’s somewhat conflicted attitudes toward prayer.

Rendering to Caesar, rendering to God

From the Office of Committee on Publication The founder of Christianity was executed by soldiers under the authority of a government official serving imperial Rome. Over the centuries since then, the relations between Christians and the governments under which they live have veered drastically back and forth.

The fact of healing in Christian Scientists’ experience

From the Office of Committee on Publication The ninth chapter of John in the Bible recounts that when Jesus healed a man who had been blind from birth, the response of the local leaders was to deny that the healing had occurred. When the fact of the healing couldn’t be denied, the leaders sought to discredit Jesus, describing him as “a sinner” and contending that the healing couldn’t therefore be attributed to him.

Real Christianity, not self-help

From the Office of Committee on Publication The basic question humanity asks in regard to all religious experience is: Is it truly of God, or is it just a human phenomenon—a product or projection of human belief? The first public question raised about Christian Science centered on just this point. In 1871, when a letter in the local newspaper assailed her teaching of Christian healing, deriding it as merely a form of “mesmerism” cloaked in religious language, Mary Baker Eddy vigorously defended the spiritual authenticity of the Science of Christianity rightly understood and practiced.

"From a Critic" and "From the Facebook page of Bloomberg Pursuits"

From the Office of  Committee on Publication: In a world fraught with religious strife and division, genuine understanding between people of differing faiths and backgrounds sometimes seems as rare as it is vital. Stereotypes abound.