"In thy presence is fulness of joy"

MUCH has been written and probably even more has been said on the subject of happiness; but until it is realized that happiness is a spiritual quality, wholly independent of material circumstances or conditions, it is entirely without foundation, like the house of the foolish man, which was built upon the sand. Happiness, it may safely be said, is the goal of every one, however devious the paths chosen for the journey. The gross materialist, the artist, the politician, the business man, the housewife, the tiny child, all are alike in that they hope to gain unending satisfaction upon the attainment of some particular achievement or object. But, as every one is forced to admit sooner or later, disillusionment and disappointment are inevitable until happiness is sought on a right basis. The materialist finds surfeit, not satisfaction; the politician finds the fruits of ambition short of expectation; the business man often achieves wealth when he fancies age has robbed him of the capacity for enjoyment, or finds out too late that, after all, his chief happiness was in the work itself, and was not merely a means to an end. And so it goes on. Mortals strive, but find the object unattainable, just out of reach, or unsatisfying; or sometimes, having gained all, go in constant dread of possible loss.

It is not till we find Christian Science and begin to see though dimly that as Mrs. Eddy says (Science and Health, p. 468), "There is no life, truth, intelligence, nor substance in matter," that we discover that happiness, like the kingdom of heaven, is within, and within our reach now. Now is the day of salvation, not to-morrow, or in a week's time, nor even in half an hour, but right here, now, this second, there is the all-powerful, shining ever presence of good.

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Editorial
The New Testament and Logic
January 7, 1922
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