SUFFERING PATIENTLY FOR ERROR*

In an article in the Christian Science Sentinel of Sept. 23, 1905, Mrs. Eddy asks this pointed question: "Which should we prefer, ease or unease in sin?" Our Leader here presents a line of thought and self-examination which we would do well to enter upon earnestly. How many of us have faced this question fairly, — have defined our position, and have answered it rightly, in our hearts? Do we honestly desire that our errors be punished ? What is our attitude towards the discomfort which our wrong thinking and wrong doing bring upon us? Are we patient or impatient with the sufferings we experience because of our lack of goodness and love? Do we rejoice for the discipline whereby we become willing to forsake our errors, or do we, in our own case, "ask wisdom to be merciful and not to punish sin"? (Science and Health, p. 10.)

Do we not too often look at this question from a self-indulgent point of view : that is, do we not persuade ourselves that our errors should pass unpunished, or that at least we should escape their full penalty without full repentance and reformation? The children of God are not punished, for we read in Scripture that "whosoever is born of God doth not commit sin;" hence it must be a false sense of man that sins and suffers. Should we ask or expect that this false sense continue its delusions and be at peace? What is there to waken mortals to the falsity of material sense except the dis-ease or dis-comfort which attends it? Although we willingly consent to the punishment of sin in the abstract, do we patiently endure the penalties for our own transgressions, knowing that thereby the nothingness of evil is being wrought out and our affections being weaned therefrom ?

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COME TO FULFIL, NOT TO OPPOSE
April 11, 1908
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