Reaching the Heights

Recently, while in the Himalaya Mountains, a party of travelers made the ascent of a high spur, called Tiger Hill, in order to see that rare and beautiful sight, — sunrise on that vast mountain range of which Mt. Everest forms the highest point. The Spiritual analogy between this and the highest point. The spiritual analogy between this and the journey which students of Christian Science are all taking, struck me forcibly as we made joyous a trip usually regarded as one of hardship.

The early morning was bright, with full moon shining overhead and making luminous the billowy white clouds beneath. After some preparations, in which the needs of each were considered, and provided for if possible, we started, some being carried in chairs to render the trip less fatiguing. Soon, however, murmurs were heard, for we seemed to be going backward, and even downward. "I don't like this way of going," said one; "I would have remained where I was, had I known we were to go backwards," said another. "Wait!" cried a voice, "trust the guides, they have been over the road and know best;" and sure enough, in a short time we were ascending steadily. Fresh difficulties soon beset us, however; a mist appeared which became a thick cloud obscured the light, and it also became very cold. With a knowledge born of experience, our guides trod the path we could not see, responding with cheerful readiness when any new order was given. There were some stragglers; one came hurrying up. saying that his companion loitered so, he was afraid of losing the way. Others, impatient to get ahead, hurried on, only to become confused, and be obliged to wait after all.

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An Interesting Letter
April 29, 1905
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