From Other Standpoints

The adherents of different schools of thought are beginning to treat each other with more courtesy and forbearance,—not that either surrenders or proposes to surrender his own opinions, and should not do so (unless satisfied that he is in error), but he is disposed to think his opponent may be honest and sincere. Men are beginning to learn that truth has many aspects; that some of these impress one mind or one class of minds, and some impress other classes of minds, and the result is differences of opinion which are unavoidable. When this becomes general, the tone and character of discussion will be changed. A temper of mind wholly unfavorable to the discovery of truth will give place to a temper conducive to such discovery. No discussion is likely to result in agreement, if conducted with bad temper, if one of the disputants feels that the other is wilfully wrong. In all such cases it is simply impossible for one of the parties to weigh candidly and impartially the arguments of the other; and the result is, they part where they began.

A. S. Wheeler.In The Christian Register (Unitarian).

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Metaphysics: the New Cult
July 27, 1899
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